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Ship Manifest: Ellis Island, S.S. St. Louis, 1908

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John Adams and family set sail on the S.S. St. Louis from Southampton (Southamptonshire, England) on May 9, 1908. They arrived at Ellis Island, New York eight days later on May 17, 1908. The family is listed on page 169 of the manifest.

Other facts noted on the manifest:

Name Age Sex Married or Single Occupation Nationality Last Permanent Residence Final Destination Height Complexion Hair Eyes Place of Birth
John Adams 25 M Married Labourer England Whaddon, England Father, Highland Avenue, Rochester, NY 5' 4" Fair Blonde Blue Meldreth, England
Alice Rose Adams 25 F Married Wife England Whaddon, England Father-in-law, Highland Avenue, Rochester, NY 5' Dark Brown Blue Meldreth, England
Beatrice May Adams 9 F Single Child England Whaddon, England Grandfather, Highland Avenue, Rochester, NY   Pale Brown Blue Meldreth, England
Lizzie Adams 4 F Single Child England Whaddon, England
"
  Fair Brown Blue Meldreth, England
David Adams 11 mos. M Single Infant England Whaddon, England
"
  Fair Blonde Blue Meldreth, England
Charles East 18 M Single Labourer England Meldreth, England Uncle John Adams, Highland Avenue, Rochester, NY 5' 4" Fair Brown Brown Meldreth, England


SS St. Louis

S.S. St. Louis

Built by William Cramp & Sons Shipbuilders, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1895. 11,629 gross tons; 554 (bp) feet long; 63 feet wide. Steam quadruple expansion engines, twin screw. Service speed 19 knots. 1,340 passengers (320 first class, 220 second class, 800 third class).

Built for American Line, in 1895 and named Saint Louis. Southampton-New York service. Used by US Navy as auxiliary cruiser in Spanish-American War of 1898. Transferred to United States Navy, American flag, in 1917 and renamed USS Louisville. Armed transport service. Returned to American Line, in 1920 and renamed St. Louis. Was badly damaged by fire while being refitted. Laid-up 1920-24. Rebuilding plans in 1922 never revitalized. Scrapped at Genoa in 1924.

Source: www.ellisisland.org.